Summer arrives in the woods

After several weeks away, it was time to visit the woods with a good long walk. Happy to be back on the trails, but not prepared for…summer!

Yes, summer has arrived, bringing a combination of high temperatures and humidity which gave this walk the first challenging conditions of the year. After a few weeks of relatively mild weather, a heat index of nearly 100 degrees was exhausting! Snacks and supplies to rehydrate and reenergize, while always welcome on walks, are more necessary now during the summer.

A few minutes into the walk, a low buzzing at first sounded like distant landscaping equipment, but it droned in and out. Cicadas! The sound of summer, and a sign to bring extra water.  Robins accompanied us along the trail as usual.  A couple of pieces of robin’s egg were visible near the trail.

The squirrels and chipmunks were busy running around collecting food and darting about in the corners of the woods. They scampered along logs and up tree trunks and dove through the leaves.

A portly chipmunk was too fast to photograph, but a couple of smaller chipmunks skillfully froze in place long enough for a few photos.

Along the trail, vines continue to stretch high and into the trail and grow around each other.  New tree saplings were establishing themselves on the ground.

Other signs of summer were evident during the walk. The woods appeared in need of rain. Soil was dry and cracked on the trail, and some of the stream beds and gullies were dry.

Mayapplies were yellowed and flopped over.

At the end of thorny stalks raspberries were ripening into bright oranges and reds.

Large white Mushrooms had emerged from the soil with papery white scrolls hanging over pink frills underneath; and mosses and lichens spread over the ground and logs.

The wintergreen plants seemed to be past their flowering stage for this year. They are quite common on the hillside where we spotted the first flower buds a few weeks ago. Now their long flower stalks have round green berries on the ends.

There were signs of insect damage and webbing in several places.  A tree trunk appeared damaged where patches of bark had been chewed at different heights on the tree. Other leaves showed tent like webbing and leaf damage.

At a bend in the trail descending toward the creek, along a dry streambed there was a fluttering sound as a black, orange and white bird preened its feathers. The bird perched in a bush on a low branch for a minute or two, fanning and fluttering his disheveled feathers. Across the streambed a female cardinal had also stopped to preen her feathers, and a bright red male alighted on her branch for just a moment before disappearing back into the green canopy.

A grey catbird hopped along over debris near the creek, posing for a moment to watch a visitor take its photo.

The main creek was actually quite clear and fish were lolling and basking in the sun or cruising in the shadows of the rocks. It was nice to sit and rest by the creek but there wasn’t much air moving. The creek and shade didn’t offer a cool enough location to retreat from the heat.

Next to the creek a mimosa tree was in bloom with white and pink brushy flowers. The tree fanned out over the creek with a slight flowery fragrance.

The heat began to take its toll on the trip home. Frequent breaks and a slower pace help prevent overheating. Unfortunately, the water in the creeks and streams are completely off-limits due to human pollution. Summer visitors must carry water and refreshments.

 

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Summer trail

 

 

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Vines continue to stretch onto the trail; the soil was dry and cracked
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An obliging chipmunk posed for a photo
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At the end of thorny stalks raspberries were ripening into bright oranges and reds
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Conopholis have all but disintegrated, leaving black seed casings on the ground
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White mushrooms

 

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Webbing and leaf damage
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Chipmunk darting about in corners of the woods
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Something new
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Wintergreen flowers have passed; now there are green berries at the end of the flower stalks

 

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Catbird posed on creek debris
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Mimosa tree and fragrance fanned out over the creek
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Creek fish were lolling and basking in the sun
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Towhee fluttering and fluffing its feathers

According to the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences online, mimosa tree (Albizia julibrissin) is native to Asia, and considered an invasive species due to its ability to grow in various soil types, to regenerate when cut back, and to reduce sunlight and nutrient availability for other species.

Eastern towhee (Pipilo erythrophthalmus) – According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology online, Eastern Towhees are birds of the undergrowth, where their rummaging makes far more noise than you would expect for their size.

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